Teachers!

If you're a teacher, Codebymath is the ideal spot to take your students for a stiumlating "computer lab." Whether you want to introduce them to coding, give them a computerized perspective on your last math lesson, or have them dabble with an Arduino, we have something you can use. Lots of teachers from all over, and in many different settings, having been using Codebymath.

If you're planning on using Codebymath, feel free to send us a quick email about your plans (t...@gmail.com). We'd be happy to consult with you a bit, or simply reassure you that you and your students are welcome to use our site (and that our server will be up and running when you need it).

Make a "learning group"

As a teacher, a learning-group will allow you to track and view your students' work here, all in a consolidated student-by-student report.

If you create an account for yourself, notice that your user name will be clickable.

If you click this, you can create a "learning group." This is simply a unique name you create as a teacher to identify your coding activity. Later, when you're with your students, if they also create accounts, they can join your learning group (by also clicking on their user name).

Once done, all coding your students do here will logged under your learning group's name. Individual reports for all of your students will then be available to you, in real-time.

Share Code

Sharing (songs, pictures, videos) is all the rave these days, why not share one's coding effort too?

You (or your students) can obtain a short link, suitable for posting on social media or emailing, that will take one directly to their coding work. This is ideal for students to use in order to share their work with you (for grading), their friends, or even their parents.

Coding Challenges

For those "experts" in your class, you can have them try our programming challenges, which are a small, open-ended, programming jobs, without any hints or examples. They are usually mathematically themed, drawn from the lessons on this site, and can be solved in 10 lines of code or so.

Coding Sandbox

If you want to give your students a chance to do some open-ended coding, perhaps even a class project, send them to our coding sandbox. Here, they'll find nothing but a code-editor and output window. No lessons, no instructions---just a place they can go and CODE.

Code on an iPhone

Students still ask: "Why should I learn to code?" Well, students can't seem to put their phones down, right? So what if code they write could be run on their phones? Using our free app, they can! Learn more. Maybe the importance of coding can be made in this way.